Powell Doubts Doha

HERE WE GO AGAIN … Doha doubts

Athletics: Powell preparing to set record straight against Gatlin
The Independent (Londre)
By Mike Rowbottom
Published: 07 June 2006

As Michael Johnson would have expected, Asafa Powell had little to say for himself when he arrived in London yesterday. Other than the fact that he is capable of running 9.70 seconds for the 100 metres, 0.07sec faster than the world record he shares with Justin Gatlin. (edit) Oh, and that he believes Gatlin’s version of the record, set last month, was probably invalid.

The laid-back 23-year-old Jamaican may not have the swagger, the buzz phrases or the tattoos of his predecessor as world record holder, Maurice Greene - the absence of which Johnson, in his post-athletic incarnation as a media commentator, appeared to be lamenting recently. But in his quietly smiling way, Powell is outspoken and uncompromising.

He has made no secret of the fact that he wishes Gatlin had stuck to his contractual agreement to race in Sunday’s Norwich Union Grand Prix at Gateshead, where the two rivals were due to meet until Gatlin withdrew, claiming that the North-east meeting was “too cold and too early”.

Powell foresees a couple of races this season involving both, with one scheduled to be the London Grand Prix at Crystal Palace on 28 July.

The Gateshead showdown became less likely following Gatlin’s performance in Doha on 18 May, when he was credited with 9.76sec, before the time was rounded up to 9.77 a few days later.

Powell recalled yesterday how news of the American’s effort had been brought to him by a Jamaican reporter. “I told him ‘Go back and get your facts straight’,” he recalled with a grin. “But then everyone came back and said ‘It’s true, it’s true’. But then people were saying there was something wrong about it. They were saying they had watched the race and it seemed real slow. No one believed in it. So why should I?” Powell’s scepticism has been provoked not just by the timing alteration, but by other performances on the night, notably that of Olusoji Fasuba of Nigeria, who set an African record of 9.85sec in second place.

“I beat Fasuba pretty easily in the Commonwealth Games,” Powell said. “His best was 10.09 before Doha. That was a pretty big jump to make.” Powell has also noted rumours that the following wind was well over the permitted limit of one metre per second. “Other athletes in that race were saying the wind speed had to be plus four or plus five.” His estimation of his time this year was offered reluctantly in response to a question. “9.77 to 9.70,” he said. “It’s an arm’s length away.”

There is an outside chance that the Gateshead 100m might contain Britain’s Dwain Chambers, who has served his two-year doping ban but is in negotiations with the international body over repaying race fees from before his positive test. Powell has trained with Chambers in Jamaica in recent weeks, and says the Briton is “looking good”.

As Michael Johnson would have expected, Asafa Powell had little to say for himself when he arrived in London yesterday. Other than the fact that he is capable of running 9.70 seconds for the 100 metres, 0.07sec faster than the world record he shares with Justin Gatlin. And that all those athletes who cheat with drugs should be banned for life, if not given jail sentences. Oh, and that he believes Gatlin’s version of the record, set last month, was probably invalid.

The laid-back 23-year-old Jamaican may not have the swagger, the buzz phrases or the tattoos of his predecessor as world record holder, Maurice Greene - the absence of which Johnson, in his post-athletic incarnation as a media commentator, appeared to be lamenting recently. But in his quietly smiling way, Powell is outspoken and uncompromising.

He has made no secret of the fact that he wishes Gatlin had stuck to his contractual agreement to race in Sunday’s Norwich Union Grand Prix at Gateshead, where the two rivals were due to meet until Gatlin withdrew, claiming that the North-east meeting was “too cold and too early”.

Powell foresees a couple of races this season involving both, with one scheduled to be the London Grand Prix at Crystal Palace on 28 July.

The Gateshead showdown became less likely following Gatlin’s performance in Doha on 18 May, when he was credited with 9.76sec, before the time was rounded up to 9.77 a few days later.
Powell recalled yesterday how news of the American’s effort had been brought to him by a Jamaican reporter. “I told him ‘Go back and get your facts straight’,” he recalled with a grin. “But then everyone came back and said ‘It’s true, it’s true’. But then people were saying there was something wrong about it. They were saying they had watched the race and it seemed real slow. No one believed in it. So why should I?” Powell’s scepticism has been provoked not just by the timing alteration, but by other performances on the night, notably that of Olusoji Fasuba of Nigeria, who set an African record of 9.85sec in second place.

“I beat Fasuba pretty easily in the Commonwealth Games,” Powell said. “His best was 10.09 before Doha. That was a pretty big jump to make.” Powell has also noted rumours that the following wind was well over the permitted limit of one metre per second. “Other athletes in that race were saying the wind speed had to be plus four or plus five.” His estimation of his time this year was offered reluctantly in response to a question. “9.77 to 9.70,” he said. “It’s an arm’s length away.”

There is an outside chance that the Gateshead 100m might contain Britain’s Dwain Chambers (edit). Powell has trained with Chambers in Jamaica in recent weeks, and says the Briton is “looking good”.

So Powell thinks people should be banned for life and given jail sentences but he is training with Chambers and giving him compliments…good one, Asafa.

Asafa doesn’t have much flair so maybe he should just stop talking this weak crap.

Let’s take an example: Francis Obikwelu:
Doha 12 May : 10.16 (w2.1) 10.14 (w1.7)
Eugene 28 May : 10.12 (w2.5)
Zaragoza 03 Jun : 10.06 (w2.9) 9.84 (w5.4)

When wind is AROUND 2.0m/s, Francis can run around 10.1, when the wind is +5, it moves to 9.84.

In Eugene, Asafa did 9.93 and Francis 10.12, so he beats him by 0.19. In Doha, Fasuba beats him by 0.29…

On other example: Shawn Crawford
Doha 12 May : 10.07 (w2.1) 10.09 (w1.7)
Eugene 28 May : 10.04 (w2.5)
Oslo 02 Jun : 10.01 (w1.6) 10.02 (w-0.9)
Are you sure there was too much wind for Crawford in Doha, in the light of his next performances?
By the way, Asafa beats Crawford by 0.11 in Eugene and by 0.03 in Oslo. Fasuba beats Crawford by 0.24 in Doha.

Why Olu didn’t confirmed Doha?
illness + oedema/absess/allergia + fatigue + detraining. The season just starts… He is still standing up and wants to compete.

How come wind was blowing only in Justin and Olu’s lanes? :smiley: VERY UNFAIR !!!

At least athletes, coahces, managers, journalists, meeting directors and sponsors trust Doha.

We all know it’s just about money, with that DUAL, nobody else is allowed to disturb. Can we remember that dual in Zürich’88 : Calvin Smith ruined it, Gateshead’93? Drummond ruied it. 2006? If not Olu, someone else will probably ruin it again. BUT can this DUAL happen, since Gatlin’s camp ask for 200,000$ to race against Asafa?

nice examples. But Asafa has beaten Olu clearly at the CWG.

but it seems to be a fact that Fasuba made an incredible race at Doha.
But honestly ,im not sure if he can ever repeat this performance…

Dont you think this was kind of the race of his life, even though he is still very young?

asafa was in Melbourne for 3 weeks, Olu arrived 4 days before the race as he was competing at World Indoors in a hard tournament (3 races with 3 or 4 hours between each). Even if Asafa eased at the end, i doubt he was able to run faster than 9.98-10.00. Because that’s not because you shut down effort that your speed curve is shutting down as well.

Race of his life at 21, if so i stop coaching!!!

pjb,
the doubters will never be satisfied about Doha despite so much evidence previously presented by Olu’s coach to suggest that results in the men’s 100 were OK.
Obviously most folks hope Olu will go on to repeat and improve on 9.85. He has plenty of time in his career in which to do it.

But even if for reasons we may not foresee he cannot run so fast again, it remains a wonderful achievement by athlete and coach. Why doubt Olu but not the man who finished inches ahead of him. If anything is strange, perhaps it is that Olu was not given a faster time because he seemed so close to Gatlin at the line.

HMMMM a bit of haterade on your part PJB? Fasuba has validated his performances in my opinion just as Gatlin has.All this happens when people who are slower than you begin to talk. If Fasuba never ran 9.8,would ato boldon be talking? Its funny,he ran 10.1 at commonwealth,then 9.9 at the prelim in Doha,and then 9.8.That doesnt seem that huge to me…

Results validate themselves, no need for opinions to do that. Gatlin’s performance at Prefontaine Classic is, however, a pretty clear indicator of what happened in Doha. On the other hand, Asafa’s “shutting-down-strategy” is becoming somewhat amusing. At least Gatlin seems confident enough to face his capacity, thus running the whole 100m every time. Can we say the same about Asafa?

Did he? I had my doubts ESPECIALLY looking at Fasuba’s and Henry’s performances and the fact that it was a very windy day indeed:

Season 06 just Finals/Heats only if Final wasn’t reached (Doha bold):
Fasuba: 10.11 - 9.85 - 10.33 (+1.4) - 10.19 (+0.5)
Anson: 10.28 - 10.12 - 10.41 (-1.4) - 10.34 (+1.0)

But it was ONLY Gatlins 9.87 at (-0.1) in NY that convinced me that Doha was +1.7 legal. As I said I always listen to arguments (as long as they do not sound like: “He’s the man”) and am willing to learn the truth…

Find some pros and cons:
http://www.charliefrancis.com/community/showthread.php?t=12954&page=2&pp=15

Asafa has gone down in my opinion big-time with his bitchy and stupid commentary. For a guy with a track record of flopping in big meets, the last thing he should EVER do is bad-mouth his chief rival. He has enough of a problem with competition to worry about being beaten by someone he considers to be overrated! Same for the other big-mouth, Veronica Campbell, who talked herself into a corner by calling Marion a has-been, and then lost! Notice Marion was very circumspect when commenting on her opponants, giving them lots of credit, even when they lost. That way she’s creating a far better competitive climate, lowering the pressure on herself for later, whatever happens.

GATLIN
9.95 (-0.1) 9.77 (1.7) 9.84 (1.1) 9.88 (1.0) 9.87 (-0.1)
FASUBA
10.14 (0.0) 10.13 (0.2) 10.11 (0.9) 10.26inj (0.2) 9.84 (1.7) 10.33 (1.4) 10.19 (0.5)
CRAWFORD
10.09 (1.7) 10.04 (2.5) 10.02 (-0.9)
TRAMMELL
10.11 (1.7) 10.20 (1.5) 10.20 (1.6)
HENRY
10.25 (1.2) 10.26 (0.2) 10.49 (0.0) 10.12 (1.7) 10.37 (0.0) 10.41 (-1.4) 10.34 (1.0)
OBIKWELU
10.14 (1.7) 10.12 (2.5) 9.84 (5.4)
EMEDOLU
10.14 (0.2) 10.15 (1.8) 10.22 (0.9) 10.26 (0.4) 10.24 (0.2) 10.17 (1.7) 10.10 (5.4) 10.40 (0.0)
NORMAN
10.24 (1.9) 10.27 (-0.1) 10.40 (0.4) 10.34 (1.7) 10.44 (1.0)

So now you see that the only ones who have not shown similar form after of before Doha are Fasuba and Henry. We know the reasons for Fasuba, i don’t know the story for Henry. 2 out of 8. And if that wasn’t enough, the heats and final in Doha show similar results taking in account the wind differences. Oh yeah i forgot, the wind was blowing on Fasuba and Henry’s lanes only (a deal with the organisators before the meet, no worry).

If you quote the wind readings for jumps, don’t forget to say that wind record is the mean value during 5 seconds during jumps (hence recording higher burst) and 10 and 13 seconds in sprints and hurdles. Also, don’t forget to say that the jump events took place at the opposite side of the stadium.

Doesn’t really matter what you say, there are those who will always have a complaint about the times of others and an excuse if their own projections don’t turn out.
I remember a meet once where a particular fan’s favourite ran an 11.03 semi, looking pretty easy and this guy started shouting: “She’s ready! She’s ready!”. Then My girl ran 10.92 with a bad start in the second semi, and, suddenly, this guy starts complaining: “Well, you know my girl’s been nursing a sore hamstring for the last two weeks!”
The race is over and the results are in!

Thank you PJ for provided such could analysis and insight. To this day I fail to understand why members and media question the validity of the results of two competitors in a race that had 8 :confused: So strange.

Regarding the comparison between the wind readings for the jumps and the sprints, do you how many minutes or hours apart they were (jumps from sprints). Schedule should be clear before such comparisons are made.

Thanks

The schedule doesn’t really clarify the situation; the wind meter during the actual run is still – despite reasoning hence and forth – the most reliable source of information we have. On a side note about the jumps: the jumper has at least 30 seconds at his disposal to “choose” what he feels as the best wind situation for his jump. Usually, when you stay on the infield and wait for your turn, you get a pretty good sense about the wind situation (i.e. the difference between “good” and “bad” winds), hence instinctively will wait longer if the wind doesn’t feel good immediately, and conversely, start the approach a bit quicker if the “blow” is already there.

BTW, Pierre-Jean, can you tell us where you got the directional fan for Olu? Never mind! I know you want to keep your secrets, so I’ll ask Anson where he got his next time I see him!

i never wanted to say that i doubt Doha.
Yes, i first did, but i have been convinced because of Gatlins performances(but also not of course Olu’ so far)

SO, OF COURSE FASUBA’s 9,85 WERE CORRECT, IF GAT’S 9,77 WERE CORRECT!

Thats not the point, i just remembered PJ saying that Olu had fever and so on at Doha. And i m curios, if Olu can run these times with less fever :slight_smile:

So, PJ: What do you think: How far can Olu go. Reading your comments you must think about sub 9,80 for sure, or?

I’ve been trying to get someone to make me a weather control machine for some time now…

Regarding Inconsistency: athletes are not machines, even BJ lost a race severely immediately following 86 Com Games. I think he may have even been unplaced, somewhere in Britain. My own coaching experience, due to various injury-type issues and motivational/inspiration ups and downs with this athlete, saw my best guy run 400m in 46.1 just before the Olympics, then a series of 44s including 44.3, and then in the very next meet after the Ogs up in Japan, he ran so badly i think he may have run something like 47sec (partly due to weather - there was a cyclone, partly due to accumulated fatigue and motivation again - he and Danny Everett made a deal to see who could win slowest. My guy ran slowest but lost the race. Idiot :stuck_out_tongue: )

Aside from having class or not, Asafa shouldn’t downplay Gatlin’s feat – he should tout it and welcome the competition. Asafa and J.G. fell ass-backwards into the biggest thing in track in years, and they are both blowing it (in J.G.'s case, Nehemiah is doing it for him). Instead of downing each other’s feats and talking about wind, timing, etc., they should be trying to bill this as the biggest showdown in sports. This race, or races, should be all over the mainstream sports coverage, but no one is pitching it right. Maybe they should hire Don King. :rolleyes:

Would be interesting to see a poll on forum members views on the Doha result (accepted as correct or doubtful) .

I would start it but don’t know how :frowning: